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By supporting tobacco-free and smoke-free policies in Louisiana from the parish to city to the municipalty level, our campaign has been able to make great strides in creating tobacco-free and smoke-free environments and workplaces across the state. 

STATEWIDE TOBACCO-CONTROL RELATED POLICIES

ACT 815: Established smoke-free workplaces and public spaces, including restaurants. Bars and gaming Facilities are exempt.

ACT 838: Prohibited smoking in cars where children under the age of 13 are present.

ACT 211: Prohibited smoking on all college campuses throughout Louisiana.

ACT 278: Prohibited the sale of electronic cigarettes and vapor pens to persons under age 18.

SMOKE-FREE ORDINANCES

Healthier Air for All has been instrumental in supporting and promoting these ordinances, each of which has helped advance the smoke-free Louisiana movement. 

CITY OF ALEXANDRIA: January 1, 2012
The Alexandria Smoke-Free Ordinance prohibits smoking in all enclosed public spaces of employment, including bars and gaming facilities.

TOWN OF WOODWORTH: April 2012
This local policy prohibits smoking in all public places and spaces of employment, including future bars and gaming facilities.

CITY OF MONROE, WEST MONROE, OUACHITA PARISH: Janary 2, 2014
This local policy prohibits smoking in all enclosed public spaces of employment, including bars and gaming facilities.

TOWN OF CHENEYVILLE: June 8, 2014
This local policy prohibits smoking in all public places and spaces of employment, including future bars and gaming facilities.

CITY OF NEW ORLEANS: April 22, 2015
This ordinance establishes smoke-free public spaces and places of employment, including bars and gaming facilities.

CITY OF HAMMOND: July 20, 2015
This ordinance prohibits smoking in enclosed public places, including all bars and gaming facilities.

TOBACCO-FREE COLLEGES

Over the past ten years, there have been multiple institutions that have established tobacco-free policies, ranging from footage ordinances to complete smoke-free district or institutional ordinances. And in 2014, ACT 211 was passed, which established smoke-free public colleges and universities in Louisiana, of which there are 37 out of 40 across the state.

TOBACCO-FREE HEALTHCARE FACILITIES

Nearly 90 hospitals, medical centers and clinics in Louisiana have enacted smoke-free rules, either designating whole smoke-free campuses or smoke-free areas and environments throughout their establishments. 

TOBACCO-FREE PHARMACIES

The sale of tobacco in pharmacies makes it harder for smokers to quit. Tobacco retail displays are typically placed at the point of sale where cessation aids are almost always located. Tobacco retail displays and product ads act as cues to smoke and stimulates physical and emotional cravings associated with tobacco use. This is a known barrier to quitting and can lead to impulse purchases of tobacco products. [1,2, 3, 4]

The sale of tobacco in pharmacies sends a mixed message. Pharmacists are the most accessible healthcare providers thus pharmacies are the most accessible healthcare facilities. The sale of tobacco in pharmacies provides credibility to tobacco products by implying that they are safe to use and cause little to no harm. Youths are particularly sensitive to this message, which can lead to the initiation of tobacco use. [5,6]

The sale of tobacco products in pharmacies creates a conflict of interest. Tobacco use is the leading cause of death and disease in the United States. Selling tobacco in pharmacies directly conflicts with treating patients, especially those with illnesses caused by or made worse by tobacco use. [7]

 

1. Wakefield M, Germain D, Henrikson L (2007). The Effect of Retail Cigarette Pack Displays on Impulse Purchase. Addiction, 103: 322-328.

2. Hoek, J, Gifford, H, Pirikahu, G, Thomson, G, & Edwards, R (2010). How do tobacco retail displays affect cessation attempts? Findings from a qualitative study. Tobacco Control, 19(4), 334-337.

3. Paynter J & Edwards, R (2009). The Impact of Tobacco Promotion at the Point of Sale: A Systematic Review. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 11(1): 25-35.

4. Roche, J, Sorg, A, Walsh, H, Jones, J, Brossart, L, Moreland-Russell, S, & Luke, D ( 2014, March). Regulating Pharmacy Tobacco Sales: Massachusetts. Retrieved from: http://cphss.wustl.edu/Products/Documents/POS_MA_CaseStudy_Final_electronic.pdf

5. American Pharmacists Association. Pharmacy Principals for Health Care Reform. Assessed January 21, 2015 from: http://www.pharmacist.com/sites/default/files/files/pharmacy_principles_HCR.pdf

6. U.S. Public Health Service. U.S. Public Health Service Pharmacy Prevention Strategy. Accessed March 3, 2015 from: http://www.usphs.gov/corpslinks/pharmacy/documents/PreventionStrategy.pdf

7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: Office on Smoking and Health (2011, September 6). Adult Smoking in the US. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/pdf/2011-09-vitalsigns.pdf